Huffington Post Features Images from Niger

I am pleased to announce that the Huffington Post has featured my images of the nomadic tribes of Niger.

I want to create a visual document that reminds us, and generations to come, how beautiful and diverse the world is.

I see more than ever the importance of sharing our stories to gain a deeper understanding of the timeless past as it meets the imminent future.

I am happy that a globally respected news organization shares in these concerns, attesting to the importance of the preservation of human diversity and the wonder of our planet.

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To read the full article on Huffington Post, click here. 

Humanity Photo Awards 2015

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I am excited to have won a Performance Award for my image series Ethiopia’s Omo Valley. This is the second HPA competition I have entered and won!

The Humanity Photo Awards is a biennial photography contest supported by UNESCO and the China Folklore Photographic Association and sponsored by the World Folklore Photography Association.  The CFPA is the only photographic association in the world who enjoys full operational relations with UNESCO.It’s goals are to explore and rescue the endangered folk cultures of world nationalities and to enhance mutual understanding to promote the world peace.Gold Terri-OmoValley_Ethiopia-30 Gold Terri-OmoValley_Ethiopia-36Gold Terri-OmoValley_Ethiopia-17

View the full photo series Ethiopia’s Omo Valley

The premiere exhibition Memories of the Mankind IX will be held in September 2015 in Shangri-la City, Yunnan Province, China. 

Humanity Photo Awards (HPA) is an international competition, aiming to call upon photographers all over the world to widely and deeply record and preserve the heritage of the folk culture. HPA finds a way for photography to ally with folklore, anthropology and sociology and its photo series provide the most systemic specimens and trustworthy evidence for cultural heritage, which is far beyond artistic value.

Nomads In Niger on BBC Picture Desk

Images from my Nomads In Niger series are now featured on The BBC Picture Desk.

TerriGold_NomadsInNiger_19“I was blessed to share time with this incredibly unique group of people and to learn about their cultural traditions, communal values and ethical perspectives”

I see more than ever the importance of sharing our stories to gain a deeper understanding of the timeless past and the imminent future. The cultural diversity of our planet  is where our greatest creativity lies. Our challenge now is to keep the poetry of diversity alive…

The BBC feature can be viewed here.

Photo+ Magazine features Niger and Omo Valley

Terri Gold’s images from the Nomads in Niger series and the Omo Valley of Ethiopia series were just published as a three page spread in Photo+ a prestigious Korean photography magazine. Both featured image series are from Terri’s ongoing body of work “Still Points in a Turning World”.

Excited to be turning the glossy magazine pages of the Photo+ Magazine feature of my images from Africa! It is  nice to have your work embraced by an international photography community.


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feature shoot – Photographer gains Once-In-A-Lifetime Access ToThe Festival Of Niger’s Nomadic Tribes

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So happy to have work presented on the Feature shoot blog today. Link to the full article here

When rainfall quenches the bone-dry terrain of Southern Niger, says New York-based travel photographer Terri Gold, a thousand Wodaabe nomads, along with thousands of their treasured animals, coverage across the desert in celebration of the The Guérewol Festival. As part of the weeklong event, the men dress in traditional finery, adorn their faces in paint, and perform for hours in hopes of winning the admiration of a set of young women judges. After braving the 110 degree heat in search of the merrymaking, Gold at last happened upon Guérewol after weeks of anticipation. 

Niger has hosted no tourism for the better part of the last decade, explains the photographer, who embarked on her journey with three additional women. Because of the political surroundings and the threat of al Qaeda members coming in from Libya, she was flanked by eighteen armed guards who bore automatic rifles in hands; the trucks in which she traveled were outfitted with fifty millimeter machine guns. Drawn initially to Niger by the work of fellow photographer Carol Beckwith, Gold was guided by The Nomad Foundation’s Leslie Clark, who took them from the city of Agadez, where the mud brick mosque of 1515 still stands, and into the desert.

Because the Wodaabe tribes are spread out across the land, Gold and her companions had no way of knowing precisely when they would convene for the annual festival. The Wodaabe are governed by the whims of the Sahel; they follow in the footsteps of their goats, camels, donkeys, sheep, and cattle in pursuit of the water sources that change continuously with the seasons. Life for the nomad is treacherous and each is exposed to the brutal elements, and yet for Gold, this is part of the beauty of the Wodaabe. Their philosophies are founded on both the bitterness of their struggle and the abounding rewards of their perseverance. The photographer repeats the Wodaabe adage, “Who cannot bear the smoke will never get to the fire”.

Only in the season of rain are they able to converge as a community, to find lovers, and to carry out age-old customs. Guérewol, suggests Gold, is a joyous sight, filled with laughter, singing, and dance. One the men have dressed up and performed for the women, winners are chosen based on strength, stamina, and beauty. They bear a cloth that covers the lower half of the body, embellished belts, and headdresses ornamented with feathers, all of which create the effect of great height. As the sun beats down upon them, they endure until at last the women advance and make their picks.

Though al Qaeda groups were to enter the area only days after Gold had departed, she admits that violence and unrest seemed far away during her time amongst the nomads; all fears were secured and hushed when she lay “camping under a tapestry of one hundred thousand stars accompanied by the lullabies of the animal herds.”

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Terri Gold  of United States was Awarded: Third Prize in category Portraiture for the entry entitled, ” Hint of Henna in Niger .” The jury selected PX3 2015’s winners from thousands of photography entries from over 85 countries. 


The “Prix de la Photographie Paris” (Px3) strives to promote the appreciation of photography, to discover emerging talent, and introduce photographers from around the world to the artistic community of Paris. Winning photographs from this competition are exhibited in a high-profile gallery in Paris and published in the high-quality, full-color Px3 Annual Book.