Fem Worldview features photographs from The Omo Valley

Screen Shot 2015-03-31 at 12.17.21 PMFem Worldview Magazine is a publication showcasing extraordinary women from around the world. I am honored to be featured alongside of a group of such powerfully engaging female photo-journalists and cultural photographers.

Fem Worldview recognizes the need for women photographers and photo-journalists to travel to the remote places of the world with our cameras, which can produce images to inspire and influence the way we view and relate to foreign cultures.

Read the full story at femworldview.com

In the Omo Valley, Ethiopia

In the Omo Valley, Ethiopia

First Prize Winner- New York Center for Photographic Art

SurmafamilyintheOmoValley675

I was thrilled to be chosen as a 1st place prize winner in the 2014 New York Center for Photographic Art Black and White Awards for her photograph Surma Family In the Omo Valley

The New Century Artists Gallery in Chelsea’s gallery district will exhibit Surma Family In the Omo Valley from April 7-19, 2015, with an opening reception on Thursday, April 9, 2015

To view the online gallery, click here: BlackAndWhite2014Gallery

 

The Buglisi Dance Theatre’s Benefit Fete d’Amour

As a preview to their 17th anniversary season on February 15-20th, at The Joyce Theater, The Buglisi Dance Theatre performed at the Cultural Services of the French Embassy for the DBT’s benefit ‘Fete ‘d Amour’ on Thursday, December 9th. The celebration of love will unfold this Valentine’s week as DBT performs the world premiere of  ‘Letters of Love on Ripped Paper’. The piece is inspired by letters between legendary lovers, such as Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, Napoleon and Josephine, and is set to an original score by Daniel Brewbaker.

Buglisi Dance Theatre



aCurator- Featured Photographer

View the magazine photo feature

aCurator is a full screen magazine featuring photography and art, edited and published by Julie Grahame in New York…

I am happy to be the current featured artist.

“My ongoing body of work, ‘Still Points in a Turning World’, explores our universal cross-cultural truths: the importance of family, community, ritual and the amazing diversity of its expression.

“The differences between our many world cultures are fading away. We all lose when ancient skills and visionary wisdom are forgotten. As a ‘visual archeologist’, photography has become my way to honor and celebrate an existence that may soon vanish and what it is that makes a people unique. I believe that sharing these stories and rituals can have a positive impact by providing a window on our common humanity.” – Terri Gold, July 2010

Click here to View the Blog Site feature

Tribal Life in India: South Rajasthan and Kutch Photo Expedition

I am just back from a wonderful trip to Southern Rajasthan & Gujarat. In recent years I have been planning my own trips with well-known Photographer & Writer Mary Altier, her husband John Walker and my sister Ellen.  After meeting Tewfic El-Sawy and following his blog, The Travel Photographer, I decided to join the Tribes of South Rajasthan & Kutch Photo~Expedition™. It was wonderful group of accomplished photographers, well traveled with great stories to tell on those long bus rides and each with their own unique style and vision. The focus of the trip was exploring the tribal cultures of the Rabaris, Garasias, Bhils, Wadha and the reclusive Jats who we came upon one day by the side of the road. I am always looking at our cross-cultural truths, the importance of family, community, and ritual, and the amazing diversity of its expression. What intrigues me is discovering how people live, as if in different millennia, yet co-existing at the same time. Minds set in different ages, walk the same dusty streets, drink the same water and live out their lives amidst the cows, which wander everywhere, and the riotous colorful confusion.

My work is interpretative in nature. I was shooting with a Canon 5D converted to Infrared by Lifepixel.com and a Canon 5D Mark II often using the Lensbaby. I have always been attracted to creating imagery using the invisible infrared light spectrum and using other special effects lenses and filters. It adds an element of mystery and surprise to creating the work, to the post production and then to its presentation.

I found it interesting to see what caught each photographer’s eye and how it could expand my way of seeing. Some people went straight into the villager’s personal space and caught and held their eyes. Some posed their subjects like models while others looked for color and pattern. Also interesting to see the different configurations of cameras and gear; from computers, backup devices (I used the Hyperdrive Colorspace UDMA) to camera bags.

I met some amazing people, friendships were formed and future travel companions made and I had experiences that I will not forget. Now the next stage begins with creating and shaping a cohesive body of work.

Imagery and more stories to come in the days ahead…